• Brown Creek Equine Hospital
  • 7453 Highway 74,
  • Polkton,
  • North Carolina,
  • Phone: (704) 272-7447

Library

Content Library

  • The term colic simply means abdominal pain. There are many causes of colic and symptoms range from very mild to violent.

  • Like other pets and people, mini-pigs can suffer from numerous health problems including inner/middle ear infections, foot abnormalities, atrophic rhinitis, pneumonia, intestinal parasites and obesity. Obesity can lead to joint injury and arthritis. Mini-pigs may ingest inappropriate items leading to gastrointestinal tract blockages. If blockages are not dealt with quickly intestinal rupture and death. obesity and are prone to joint injury, arthritis, and foot abnormalities.

  • Young, male mini-pigs commonly develop urolithiasis in which uroliths form lodge in their urethras, causing life-threatening urinary tract obstructions. Male mini-pigs also suffer from cryptorchidism, in which the testicles fail to move from inside the abdomen to the groin. Older, un-spayed female pigs commonly develop leiomyoma uterine tumors. Two common eye problems are entropion (the eyelids roll inward, toward the eyeball) and distichiasis (in which eyelashes on the upper eyelid are misdirected, so that they point in toward and rub on the eyeball). Erysipelas is a bacterial infection characterized by diamond-shaped, red, raised skin lesions that is fatal but is preventable with vaccination. Because mini-pigs are non-discriminatory eaters, they tend to eat all sorts of inappropriate things, including rodenticides which can be deadly if not treated quickly.

  • The term 'contracted tendons' describes a condition where the leg is excessively straight, usually at the fetlock or coronary band, i.e., corono-pedal joint, but it occasionally also affects the knees.

  • Corns are specific types of bruises of the sole, specifically occurring at the angle of the sole between the hoof wall and the bars, i.e., at the 'seat of corn', most commonly affecting the medial (inside) aspect of the front feet.

  • Parasitic worms live in the intestines of horses and ponies. Small numbers of worms can be tolerated, causing no effect on well-being.

  • Diarrhea means the production of feces that are softer than normal. Normal equine feces are produced in formed, non-offensive smelling, greenish-brown, semi-solid portions that will break up in the hand, revealing varying degrees of fibrous content depending upon diet.

  • Potential purchasers of yearlings and even foals at public sales increasingly ask for endoscopic examinations ('scoping') of the larynx and pharynx to be performed in an attempt to assess 'soundness of wind'.

  • Epistaxis means simply bleeding from the nose. The term can therefore cover anything from a tiny trickle down one nostril to a heavy gushing from both nostrils. Blood that appears at the nostril can originate from anywhere in the upper or lower respiratory tract including the sinuses or other closely related structures of the head.

  • Horses and ponies are efficient herbivores and one of the key adaptations that evolution for a life of grazing has equipped them with is a set of hardwearing and specialized teeth.